Pupil Premium Strategy

 

The Government have set up a fund that allows schools some additional money to help support certain children. The document below explains how the money is spent in school.

1.   Summary information

School

Corfield Church of England Infant School

Academic Year

2018-19

Total PP budget

£22440

Date of most recent PP Review

Oct 2018

Total number of pupils

90

Number of pupils eligible for PP

26

Date for next internal review of this strategy

Oct 2019

 

 

2.   Current attainment

2018 Summer Data

Pupils eligible for PP (your school)

Pupils not eligible for PP (national average)

All pupils

National Average

% making a Good Level of Development at the end of EYFS

44%

81%

70%

71.5%

% meeting the expected standard in phonics at Y1

86%

96%

96%

82%

% achieving expected standards in reading at Y2

0%

96%

81%

75%

% achieving expected standards in writing at Y2

0%

83%

70%

70%

% achieving expected standards in maths at Y2

0%

91%

78%

76%

 

 

3.   Barriers to future attainment (for pupils eligible for PP, including high ability)

 In-school barriers (issues to be addressed in school, such as poor oral language skills)

A.    

Aspirations are low, from both parents and pupils.

B.    

Baseline assessments show a large attainment gap between PP and non-PP children

C.

The fine motor skills required to write effectively are less developed in some of the children entitle to Pupil Premium which hinders their enjoyment and ability in writing activities

External barriers (issues which also require action outside school, such as low attendance rates)

D.

Pupils have little opportunity or encouragement to read outside school

E.

Many pupils in school are not engaging in out of school activities such as sports and the arts so do not have the opportunities to experience these outside of the school curriculum.

 

4.   Desired outcomes

 

Desired outcomes and how they will be measured

Success criteria

A.    

PP children are able to talk about their aspirations for the future and have an improved ‘I can’ attitude towards their learning.

Children’s attitudes towards learning will improve and they will have a developing growth mind-set.  They will be making rapid progress.

Parents will also be encouraged to be aspirational for their children.

B.    

To diminish the in-school differences between PP and non PP children in reading and maths.

School assessment systems will show that children are making progress in literacy and there is a diminishing difference between their reading standards and those of non PP children.  A greater proportion of pupils entitled to PP in Y1 will be on track for meeting expectations at the end of Y2 in reading and a greater proportion of pupils entitled to PP in Y2 will have met expectations in reading and maths.

 

C.    

Children will have increased their dexterity and fine motor manipulation in order to write more clearly and with a higher quality of presentation skills, leading to a greater enjoyment of writing activities as this barrier is removed.

School assessment systems will show that children are making progress in writing and there is a diminishing difference between their writing standards and that of others nationally.  A greater proportion of pupils entitled to PP in Y1 will be on track for meeting expectations at the end of Y2 in writing and a greater proportion of pupils entitled to PP in Y2 will have met expectations in writing in comparison to last year’s data.

D.    

Children will have the opportunity to read at home and parents will be encouraging and aspirational.

Expectations of support from home will be raised and made clear to all new parents.  Support staff will play a larger part in encouraging reading.  Reading areas in classrooms will be improved and children will also have regular access to the school library.  The summer reading challenge will have increased the number of children who have read over the summer holidays.  Books will be provided for the PP children to ensure they have reading materials at home.

E.     

Pupil’s will have the opportunity to participate in sports and arts based activities in school within and beyond the curriculum.

Through the provision of a high quality sports coach delivering sports during and after school twice a week the PP children will have the opportunity to try a large variety of sports.  After school clubs will be offered free of charge and PP children will be encouraged to attend.

 

 

5.   Planned expenditure

Academic year

2018-19

The three headings below enable schools to demonstrate how they are using the pupil premium to improve classroom pedagogy, provide targeted support and support whole school strategies.

    i.   Quality of teaching for all

Desired outcome

Chosen action / approach

What is the evidence and rationale for this choice?

How will you ensure it is implemented well?

Staff lead

When will you review implementation?

A - PP children are able to talk about their aspirations for the future and have an improved ‘I can’ attitude towards their learning.

Mixed ability and whole class teaching to ensure all children are given the same opportunities and opportunity for challenge.

Celebrations of achievements through star assemblies and other rewards eg reading rainbow.

Many children across the school, but particularly those who are pupil premium, have a fixed mind-set and low self-esteem which impacts on their learning and progress.  This is shown through low levels of parental engagement.

Feedback for parents verbally and on questionnaires and feedback from staff.

Subject leader observations and Headteacher observations will ensure good practice as will book and planning scrutiny.  Pupil progress meetings and pupil interviews will measure impact of approach.

Class teachers

April 2019

B – Diminished in-school differences between PP and non PP children in reading.  A target of 55% PP children to reach ARE.

Good quality guided reading twice a week for PP children.

Differentiated comprehensions with good quality feedback.  In-class support for this group.

 

Focussed teaching structured so that pupils know what is to be learned, how it fits with what they already know and can do already and what they are learning will lead to improvements.  DFE research ‘Pupil Premium Making it work in your school’.

Subject leader observations and Headteacher observations will ensure good practice as will book and planning scrutiny.  Pupil progress meetings and pupil interviews will measure impact of approach.

Class teachers

April 2019

B – Diminished in-school differences between PP and non PP children in maths.  A target of 55% PP children to reach ARE.

Continue to use ‘Maths No Problem’ to whole class groups.

Basic skills lessons.

Training for Teaching assistants.

INSET training on questioning.

PP children need to be given the confidence to use what they know to build on their successes. 

Subject leader observations and Headteacher observations will ensure good practice as will book and planning scrutiny.  Pupil progress meetings and pupil interviews will measure impact of approach.

Headteacher

April 2019

C - Children will have increased their dexterity and fine motor manipulation in order to write more clearly and with a higher quality of presentation skills, leading to a greater enjoyment of writing activities

Gross and fine motor activities daily (eg finger gym, dough disco, handwriting practice). 

Small scale Action Research projects such as at St Thomas More’s Catholic Primary, Hampshire and The Perse School, Cambridge on fine motor activities such as Dough Gym and Funky Fingers (developed by Alistair Bryce-Clegg) and Galina Dolya’s Finger Gym have found these to be effective in improving children’s fine motor control. Additionally articles such as. Factoring in Fine Motor: How Improving Fine Motor Abilities Impacts Reading and Writing (St. John, S., 2013) identify the benefits of this type of activity.

Staff training will initially develop staff understanding of gross/fine motor control and the development of pencil grip in young children. This will then enable teachers to identify the needs of their class based on analysis. Staff will be trained to utilise ‘Squiggle While you Wiggle’ and ‘Every Child a Mover’ activities.

Literacy Leader

April 2019

 

Main cost for HLTA to provide in-class support

Total budgeted cost

 

 

 

£10,344

 

 

Targeted support

Desired outcome

Chosen action/approach

What is the evidence and rationale for this choice?

How will you ensure it is implemented well?

Staff lead

When will you review implementation?

B - Diminished in-school differences between PP and non PP children in reading.

Guided reading twice a week for PP children.

Cracking comprehension weekly for year 2

Variety of genres covered each term using new book lists.

School data.

Small group tuition +4 EEF

One to one tuition +5 EEF

Triangulation of evidence.

Intervention data

Monitoring

Data scrutiny

Feedback from staff

Pupil voice.

Literacy Lead

Termly

Daily individual reading.

 

Smaller RWI groups for PP children. RWI intervention.

Recover your reading’ scheme to target PP children.

B- To diminish the in-school differences between PP and non PP children in maths.

Keep up’ sessions for children who have not grasped concepts early in the lesson.

Online maths intervention for individuals who need help with particular concepts.

Mastery approach to maths.

Small group tuition +4 EEF

One to one tuition +5 EEF

Triangulation of evidence.

Intervention data

Monitoring

Data scrutiny

Feedback from staff

Pupil voice.

Fiona Wilson

Termly

TA for Recover Your Reading’ and TA for Maths intervention in Y1

Total budgeted cost

 

  £10,990

 

Other approaches

Desired outcome

Chosen action/approach

What is the evidence and rationale for this choice?

How will you ensure it is implemented well?

Staff lead

When will you review implementation?

D - Children will have the opportunity to read at home and parents will be encouraging and aspirational.

Expectations of support from home will be raised and made clear to all new parents during initial meeting and subsequent newsletters.

Support staff to play a larger part in supporting and encouraging reading.

Reading areas in classrooms to be improved Children to have regular access to the school library.

Summer reading challenge to be encouraged.

Books to be provided for the PP children to ensure they have reading materials at home.

Reading rainbow to be a visual reminder in the hall.

Children need to practice reading 20minutes per day. Talking about the story is also important. Children who read at home have higher attainment and better mental health. National Literacy Trust.

Home school reading books to be checked regularly.

Records kept of children s movements through the reading rainbow.

Summer challenge sheets to be collected and celebrated.

Literacy Lead

Termly

E. Pupil’s will have the opportunity to participate in sports and arts based activities in school within and beyond the curriculum.

To fund PP children in extracurricular/enrichment activities.

To prioritise PP children for clubs based on their interests

In-school clubs

School trips

Visitors in to school

Outcomes from pupil progress meetings

Staff feedback

Children’s comments.

Working closely with social care

Children engaging in a range of enrichment opportunities will be logged and tracked on class tracking sheets.

 

Communication and feedback from parents and children.

Kathryn McKinley and Jennie Hill

Termly

Total budgeted cost

  £2000

 

Review of expenditure

Previous Academic Year 2017-18

 

Quality of teaching for all

Desired outcome

Chosen action/approach

Estimated impact: Did you meet the success criteria? Include impact on pupils not eligible for PP, if appropriate.

Lessons learned

(and whether you will continue with this approach)

Cost

PP children will achieve in line with all children through high quality first teaching

Extra teaching assistant in class at all times allowing teacher to work with all groups and providing support within the lesson for any children who have misconceptions.

No impact on PP children. These children had little independence or self-efficiency and did not achieve ARE at the end of the year.

Teaching assistants need to have a more defined role. Children need to be within a larger group to ensure independence. Higher level teaching assistant needs to be used in future.

£14580

Targeted support

Desired outcome

Chosen action/approach

Estimated impact: Did you meet the success criteria? Include impact on pupils not eligible for PP, if appropriate.

Lessons learned

(and whether you will continue with this approach)

Cost

PP children will make accelerated progress in reading

Children will take part in 10 week reading programme of 25 minutes per day.

Accelerated progress made for most PP children. Reading ages increased on average by 1 year. Children have increased confidence in their ability to read. Children enjoy being on the programme which helps their academic study and mental well-being. .

Children did not achieve ARE in SATs.

Higher reading levels recorded.

Target Y2 children sooner and introduce questions to increase their comprehension whilst reading.

£7290

Other approaches

Desired outcome

Chosen action/approach

Estimated impact: Did you meet the success criteria? Include impact on pupils not eligible for PP, if appropriate.

Lessons learned

(and whether you will continue with this approach)

Cost

Children will have the opportunity to read at home and parents will be encouraging.

Introduce ‘Rainbow Readers’. Badges, certificates and their photographs on show.

Higher proportion of children reading regularly especially in younger classes. Children excited about programme.

Now most children in Y1 are reading with more regularity, encourage this to continue.

Speak face to face with PP parents to explain the system and encourage collaboration.

Text parents of children who are beginning to fall behind.

£500